Tag Archives: Conservative Party of Canada

09 Apr

Random Thoughts – Lisa Raitt, Patrick Brown, NHL Playoffs and More

1. Yesterday, I was part of a gathering of around 30-35 assembled to hear Conservative leadership hopeful Lisa Raitt speak at the Beacon Harborside Resort in Jordan. Unlike fellow contenders Maxime Bernier and Kellie Leitch, she actually let loyal party members like me know before she arrived instead of after she left. Unfortunately, no one in her campaign team felt it was important to inform the hotel that she was coming. Many of us stood around along with the sales manager until MP Dean Allison finally arrived around 10:15, 15 minutes after the scheduled start time, and hastily arranged a meeting room. Raitt herself didn’t arrive until 10:30, then spent much time chatting at a table before finally addressing the crowd that had come from all across Niagara to hear her. She could at least have made a half-hearted apology and chose not to. Fashionably late doesn’t cut it.

1a. Raitt was much more impressive in Burlington a few weeks ago than she was yesterday. In particular, her pillow-soft position on the CBC caused her to sink a few spots down my ballot. In response to a question, she derided the CBC’s largesse, yet as to what she would do about it, all she said was that she would trim their budget a little. Lame. Just like her tardiness.

1b. I am always troubled by the fact that I am generally the youngest person at these Conservative meetings, and yesterday’s gathering was no exception. More young people need to get involved in how our country is run and not just pose for selfies with Bobo the Clown.

2, While speaking with a couple at my table, we were lamenting how far Ontario PC leader Patrick Brown has strayed to the left. Like me, they had also voted for Brown in the leadership race and feel very much betrayed. I recall how he chastised rival Christine Elliott for being a “red Tory” and how he would not make any major policy announcement without consultation with the membership. Oh, how times have changed.

2a. Like it or not, Brown can’t help but become the next premier of Ontario next year. One thing’s for sure, he can’t do much worse than our current premier.

3. Walking through the Beacon yesterday, I could see that its popularity is entirely due to its location nestled right along the lake.

4. Out of curiosity, when was the last time our mayor posted a selfie with a business owner, thanking him or her for investing in St. Catharines?

5. Not that I care a great deal, but congratulations to the Toronto Maple Leafs on making the playoffs. It’s certainly not a parade-worthy event, but it is nice to see a well-run organization get rewarded.

5a. It’s also nice to see a horribly-run organization like the Mark Chipman Personal Hockey Club get their just reward by having to watch the playoffs on television. Again.

6. You know things are bad when even the Mark Chipman News, also known as Socialism Illustrated and officially known as the Winnipeg Free Press, runs a couple of damning articles on fan apathy. Even the ultra-naive Scott Campbell vaguely hinted at the possibility that Chipman might think about stepping aside from hockey operations, another damning line that his editor shockingly chose not to squash.

6a. The odds that Chipman would voluntarily relinquish one iota of control of the team Manitoba taxpayers bought for him are slimmer than my odds of winning the big jackpot in the Lotto 6/49. And I don’t buy lottery tickets.

6b. A general manager who had delivered so little in six years would be figuratively roasted on a spit in every other market in North America. Just like the late John Ferguson was after so many empty promises left unfulfilled. Yet Chipman blissfully soldiers on and is still hailed as a hero in many circles around Winnipeg. I understand being grateful to have a team, but is this really what you had in mind when you were pounding your head against a stone wall for 15 years?

7. Why is Don Cherry popular?

8. As flood waters rise on the Assiniboine River, I hope that, unlike the case in 2011, that the provincial government in Manitoba cares more about helping victims than in lining Mark Chipman’s pocket.

06 Mar

CPC Leadership Event in Burlington

Thoughts and observations on my journey to, from and at the Conservative leadership event at the Burlington Convention Center yesterday:

1. On the GO bus to Burlington, I spotted at least three trucks from Bison Transport on the QEW. As I’ve said before, the SPRM continues to follow me around.

2. Seated across from me on said GO bus were a couple in their early 20s. Like, I don’t know if they, like, could finish a sentence without, like, saying “like.” Needless to say, I was, like, happy when the bus, like, pulled into the Burlington GO station.

3. I really wish they’d finish the work on the Burlington GO station so that I could use a proper washroom there instead of an outhouse.

4. To get me to within a mile of the place, I took Burlington Transit for the first time. On board was a sign, “No smoking, no food, no radios.” Once again, this is not the Old Country.

5. Walking south along Burloak Drive towards the Burlington Convention Center, I passed by Bronte Creek Provincial Park. That looks like a place I’ll want to visit.

6. I wouldn’t have minded the long walk except for what was, by Ontario standards, the miserable weather. I really have become acclimatized in more ways than one.

7. As is normal operating procedure for me, I was plenty early and had a chance to walk around and get some pictures.


There were tables from each candidate who appeared, staffed by campaign volunteers. I spoke to a member of Pierre Lemieux’s campaign, but no others. At each table were brochures outlining each candidate’s platform, but as a party member, I’ve been getting inundated with emails, so I was well aware as to where they stood. I was there to see them in person.

8. I was disappointed to see so much activity around the tables of Kevin O’Leary and Michael Chong. Those two are Liberals masquerading as Conservatives and, as far as I’m concerned, can’t drop out of the race fast enough. On a more positive note, Lisa Raitt had plenty of support in the room.

9. The crowd, estimated to have been between 800 and 900 people, were regular working-class people, many of whom were wearing suits and ties. Shabbily dressed, I almost felt a little out of place.

10. A photographer working the room had a piece of paper with “FUN” printed on it taped to his lens hood. Did he find his job so unfulfilling that he had to remind himself to think happy thoughts?

11. 10 of the 14 candidates were there and nine of them stood for a photo op before the speeches began.


Kellie Leitch, the first speaker, was running late and didn’t get there until just before she was called on stage.

12. Though I liked some of the things she had to say, I hadn’t been impressed with Leitch personally and nothing I saw from her speech convinced me otherwise. She is still not on my ballot. And not because she was, like me, born in the capital of the SPRM.

13. Pierre Lemieux, the third speaker, won some major brownie points with this voter. He got some serious applause for denouncing the carbon tax, and spoke of the need for stricter immigration and fighting against political correctness. He also had an easygoing manner about him that I liked.

14. Erin O’Toole made much of his support for the military, but there’s more to being a future prime minister than supporting the troops. Coming in, he was on my ballot. After his six minutes on stage, he wasn’t.

15. After O’Toole was the faux Conservative Michael Chong, who spent most of his allotted time on his poor immigrant story. It reminded me of listening to Devon Clunis, the ex-chief of the Winnipeg non-police, who bored me and the rest of his audience at Sturgeon Heights Collegiate some years ago repeating his “poor immigrant boy from the North End” story. Clunis turned me off with his self-serving oratory that night and Chong did likewise yesterday afternoon. As I’ve said before, somewhere, there’s a Liberal Party membership card with Chong’s name on it and I hope he avails himself of it.

16. Rick Peterson, perhaps the biggest unknown among the group, followed Chong and boasted, “I’m in it to win it,” yet only today would reveal his platform, months behind his rivals. To borrow a line from Rambo III, before continuing in the race, maybe he should go back home and think it all over again for a very, very long time.

17. Lisa Raitt followed Peterson and, like Lemieux, was impressive. She described herself as “smart, prepared and ruthless.” I like that. Coming in, she wasn’t on my ballot, but with her speech, she got her way back on it and likely in the top five. Maybe even higher.

18. Thanks for coming Chris Alexander, Steven Blaney, Kevin O’Leary and Andrew Saxton. Now please drop out.

19. On the return trip to St. Catharines, I was seated behind an older gentleman exchanging life stories with a 15-year-old girl. After he talked about his 14 grandchildren, she mentioned how her sister, who was 15 at the time, got pregnant and still doesn’t know who the father of her child is. In addition, someone else in her family got pregnant at 13. Try birth control. Better yet, try abstinence.

19a. This 15-year-old is from St. Catharines and spoke about “how bad it was there” because there had been a couple of stabbings of late. People who have never lived outside this part of the world have absolutely no concept of how bad things can really get and, for their sake, I hope they never have to find out. There’s a reason I picked up and left everything I had ever known and came here more two and a half years ago.