16 Dec

Back to Toronto – St. Lawrence Market and the Distillery District

Yesterday, I braved the “extreme cold alert” to travel to the Center of the Universe and the capital of our Great Salt Republic otherwise known as Ontario. Though the -11C temperature and occasionally biting wind made it a bit miserable at times, the people in my new part of the world can’t possibly understand the true meaning of “cold.” Tomorrow, for example, back in the Old Country, the high will be -28 with a wind chill of -41. As a friend of mine said the other day, “You can have it.”

Though it really wasn’t that bad outside, I might normally have waited for another day to make such an excursion, except that December 15 is a special day. No, it’s not because it’s the day the Indianapolis Racers folded or the day John Ferguson fired Rudy Pilous, but because it’s the nine-year anniversary of Carli Ward’s passing. My memories of that day at Grace Hospice remains as fresh as ever, and given her love of trains, riding the rails to Toronto was a fitting way to honor her.

First, however, there was the bus ride to Burlington. I went up to the top deck hoping to get the front seat, only to have it occupied by a couple of guys who must have boarded in Niagara Falls, one of whom was busy counting sheep.


Now I understand it’s first-come, first-served, but why bother taking the front seat if you’re just going to snooze all the way.


The ride was otherwise uneventful, aside from the thickening traffic entering Burlington, except for when the heat came on, giving us a blast of not only heat but of a special fragrance. Eau de fart, I believe it’s called.

I wish I had been able to get a picture, but at a construction site in Hamilton we passed by, there was a big bin with “Earth Boring” in big letters painted on it. Hey, if it’s so boring here, try another planet.

Also en route, I must have spotted about five or six salt trucks dispensing generous quantities of the essence of Ontario. I understand there was a quite a blizzard that ripped through the area after I got home, but when I was out, the streets were bone dry. But you can never put down enough salt, I suppose. There are times I wonder why they don’t mix up salt with the concrete when they pave the roads around these parts.

Following a nice train ride, after which our customer service ambassador warned us to bundle up before venturing outside, I proceeded east along Front Street.


I couldn’t help but stop and take a shot of this Metro box. In Toronto, these boxes are used for “newspapers,” but in Winnipeg, they’re used as public urinals. When the indigents need to take a dump, they use planters inside Winnipeg Square. Someone once captured the details on video, which you can see here.


After a brief stop at St. Lawrence Market, where I would return, I continued east toward the Distillery District.


As expected, there was plenty of the white stuff on the ground. There was also a fair bit of snow as well.


Touring some low-income neighborhoods:


Forget Rob Ford, it seems like John Tory is the man who needs to be stopped. Like Brian Bowman in the Old Country, he seems like someone on a tax-and-spend rampage.


A snow-covered park.


Fittingly, I spotted this mural with a train motif in the middle.


I then made a brief tour of the Distillery District, where I had been on an outing with the St. Catharines Photographic Club not too long ago. It is currently hosting the Toronto Christmas Market.


Moving on, I doubled back and proceeded west along Adelaide.


I found this post rather, well, odd. The writer in me could use this as a starting point for a novel.


I then came across St. James Park, oddly enough, located outside the Cathedral Church of St. James.


Someone taking advantage of the church’s accommodations.


Outside the church.


I continued west through the Financial District, and after a brief lunch stop, I spotted this display outside the Scotia Tower.


Heading back toward St. Lawrence Market, I spotted the St. Lawrence Center for the Arts.


I also stopped for a shot of this mural facing Front Street.


At the market, I took some time to walk around and get a number of pictures.


Much like the Forks in the Old Country, except much bigger, the market is spread out over two levels, and filled with all sorts of eclectic smells that you may or may not enjoy. Unfortunately, proper food handling practices are not always followed as one vendor was spotted sneezing into his bagels, then wiping his nose with his hands. I also noticed a few sparrows flying around inside. Perhaps they’re the “catch of the day” at one or more of the meat markets.

Worn out from another full day of exploration, it was then time to return to Union Station and board the Lakeshore West train to head back to St. Catharines. I don’t foresee a need to return to St. Lawrence Market, but no doubt, I’ll be back to the universe’s center at a future date to cover another corner of the metropolis.

10 Dec

Touring Downtown Hamilton

Thoughts, pictures and observations from my trip to Hamilton and tour of downtown today:

0. For the full collection of pictures, check the public album I posted on Facebook here.

1. You are not a true St. Catharines resident until you have sat and waited at the GO stop at Fairview Mall. It seems to be a rite of passage in these parts.

1a. You are not a true St. Catharines resident until you have left your car at the unofficial park and ride location at Fairview Mall.

1b. Why, pray tell, is there an official park and ride in Beamsville but not in Niagara’s largest city?

2. I was so relieved to see this sign when I got to Fairview. Here I was ready to jump on any old bus that came along.


3. You can always tell whether it is a weekday or on the weekend on the GO bus based on the percentage of people who pay with Presto. Weekday travelers mostly pay with Presto, while on the weekends, most pay with cash. Today, for example, I was the only one of a dozen who paid with Presto.

4. I shouldn’t have been surprised to see this dumping of salt in Grimsby, but I was. After all, this is Saltario and a light dusting of snow came down overnight. Call out the Army, for the love of Pete!™


5. Taking the Barton bus in Hamilton is an experience in itself. Low-income, shabby neighborhoods, strollers and cranky kids galore along with characters missing most of their teeth make for interesting writing fodder. If I lived in Hamilton, I might soon have enough material for a book.

5a. One of these days, I need to walk down Barton and get the full experience on the ground.

6. At a side-by-side storefront on Barton, one half was “Diapers 4 All” and the other half was a hair salon. Now there’s an interesting mix of competing smells.

7. One restaurant on Barton advertised their “feeding hours” out front.

8. One guy sitting near the back door used his loud, screeching voice to keep a running conversation going with a reluctant driver.

8a. Whatever those drivers get paid, I’m not sure it’s enough.

9. Once again, welcome to Saltario:


10. There’s a Catharine Street in Hamilton, yet in St. Catharines, there’s a Catherine Street. Go figure.


11. No slackers here:


12. They settle for nothing less than top spot at this block:


13. Another plate from the Old Country. That place just keeps following me around.


13a. As I was saying, that place just keeps following me around.


14. Many men get served here, but who’s the lone woman?


15. Now which political party do you suppose these people support?


16. Undoubtedly featuring products made right here on Earth:


17. Rub Aladdin’s lamp and take off on your magic carpet:


18. Quack:


19. For anyone planning to liquidate their family:


20. Bike rentals available right in the heart of downtown, proof that I wasn’t in the Old Country, where they would be vandalized and/or stolen within a half hour.


21. I toured Jackson Square and Hamilton City Center, indoor malls with many shops including a full-service grocery store. They were clean and I didn’t feel unsafe. For the benefit of those from the SPRM, the mirror opposite of Portage Place. It’s amazing the difference having fewer “ambassadors” can make. You know, the kind of “ambassadors” that keep trying to relieve you of even more of your money than they’ve already taken and flushed down the toilet.

22. Attached to Jackson Square is the Hamilton Public Library. It opens at 9:00 am on Saturdays. Unlike the downtown library in the Old Country that didn’t open until 10:00. Old gripes die hard.

22a. I have no doubt some staff at the Millennium Library still wonder what happened to me. To say the least, I was quite a fixture at the microfilm counter.

23. One store on James Street wrote their offerings on the sidewalk:


24. The Hamilton Store. In Hamilton, no less. You don’t say.


25. I didn’t see Rhoda here:


26. How very Ontario:


27. It was customer appreciation day for Presto users on the eastbound Barton bus that took me back to Stoney Creek thanks to a malfunctioning Presto reader.

28. Soon after I boarded the eastbound Barton bus, the driver took off just as a would-be passenger running after the bus got to the back door. It was a classic moment so reminiscent of my days taking Winnipeg Transit.

29. It was just a light dusting of snow. Honest.


30. Back in St. Catharines, it looked like a salt truck threw up on Scott Street. As I said, it was just a light dusting of snow we had.

08 Dec

Random Thoughts – Snow in the Old Country, CPC Leadership and More

Some thoughts on recent events:

1. For the record, I wasn’t happy to hear of the massive snowstorm that ripped through my former neck of the woods this week. That said, seeing the pictures made me even more pleased to no longer be living there. If that’s possible.

2. Though I have a keen interest in the CPC leadership race, I haven’t watched any of the debates as yet. I’m waiting until the number of candidates dwindles to single digits.

2a. Maxime Bernier, Andrew Scheer, Lisa Raitt and Erin O’Toole are my early favorites, in that order. Subject to change. I am maintaining an open mind.

2b. If only I didn’t have other commitments on the day Bernier came to Niagara. I would have loved to have heard what he had to say.

2c. I like some of what Kellie Leitch has to say. I just wish someone else was saying it.

2d. Dear Michael Chong: There’s a Liberal Party membership card with your name on it. Please avail yourself of it.

2e. I love that the dismantling/declawing of the CBC is finally getting discussed among the candidates. Even under Harper’s government, the CBC seemed to be a sacred cow no one was willing to touch with a 10-foot pole.

3. My book chronicling the history of the USFL’s New Jersey Generals is proving surprisingly popular. Thank you to those who have bought it.

3a. Yes, the history of a team once owned by the soon-to-be President of the United States was written by a Canadian. Go figure.

4. Censorship and a heavy left-wing bias in the mainstream media and on social networks are still going strong. The leftists just don’t get it. Donald Trump did not win the U.S. presidential election because they didn’t do enough. It’s because they did too much. People are fed up and are finally fighting back. Maybe there’s some hope for us yet.

4a. For a bias-free alternative to Twitter, please check out gab.ai. You can follow me there at @CurtisWalker.

4b. It takes a special kind of chutzpah for the Winnipeg Free Press, the biggest private-sector purveyor of left-wing political propaganda west of Ontario, to call out others for spewing fake news and propaganda.

4c. I am growing increasingly intolerant of the intolerant. I am quite happy to show respect to others with a different viewpoint as long as it is returned in kind.